Archives for posts with tag: hal jordan

crisis7

This entry’s headline is my first attempt at writing something genuinely internet. While my clickbait virginity is now something only of memory, my assertion that you will see Crisis on Infinite Earths, specifically issue #7, like you’ve never seen it before- but I must admit it is similar to how you’ve seen it before. This is the story that began many months ago when I saw George Pérez on Comic Book Men, a show that I think should be able to have a comic creator on every episode. Sadly appearances by comic book creators are rare and I don’t know why. It seems like a great way to promote comics. They’ve had a few, Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo, and Stan Lee, but mostly their guests come the worlds of film, television, garage sales, hockey, and cage fighting. In the episode “Super Friends,” three of the four Comic Book Men arrange to have George Pérez draw Wonder Man for the fourth Comic Book Man who lost a lot of his collection in Hurricane Sandy and also loved Wonder Man as Pérez had drawn him. Almost immediately upon meeting, the Comic Book Men notice a large print of the cover of Crisis on Infinite Earths #7 and Pérez points out a bit of trivia. Of all the superheroes mourning the death of Supergirl, one character is absent- a particular favorite of yours truly, Green Lantern Hal Jordan. The reason given for his omission is that Pérez simply forgot.

crisisoninfiniteearths_007-textless-pieta

I happen to have an older trade of Crisis on Infinite Earths that I scored in a brilliant craigslist acquisition a few years ago when I was first getting into comics. Last month I saw that George Pérez would be coming to this year’s Dragon Con and I started thinking what a pleasure it would be to meet him. I also took a look at my copy of Crisis of Infinite Earths, thinking it would be great if he could sign it, but then I got an idea. I rubbed out some of the black space next to Flash, making room for Hal Jordan- likely people to stand next to each other in a moment of grief. Pérez was pretty popular and my duties at the Art Show cut into my time pretty sharply, so I had to find a chunk of time to wait in line. Pérez did a lot of sketches for people and that made the line move pretty slowly. All of those sketches were much bigger than my request, at least in size.

George Pérez at Dragon Con 2014

Here you can see him drawing Hal Jordan in. Also visible is the Teen Titans book I had him sign, another gem the previously mentioned craigslist score. The shirt Pérez is wearing was made by his wife. She makes all his shirts. How splendidly romantic.

uncoloredhal

You can see him there standing near Flash and the Phantom Stranger.

closeupuncoloredhal

Here’s a close-up of the art. Like this, he looks a bit like a White Lantern, which makes him so out of place for so many reasons because despite the presence of infinite earths, there was no White Lantern Corps yet and also every other character is purple. To rectify this, I have done a quick and dirty digitizing and coloring which you can see below.

coloredhal

I’m pretty happy with my very peripheral piece of impossible comic book history and with my experience meeting Mr. Pérez, a very pleasant and patient gentleman.

Advertisements

creepyplate

The World’s Second Greatest Detective was the proud recipient of a number of creative and practical items from one of our talented friends. Like me, he likes to cover lighters in pictures and glue, but he also works with a number of other materials. He gave us three light plates, which I brought to Wonder Root. The one pictured above can be found in the rear washroom. The one below can be found right outside the Darkroom.

gadaredevilplate

One of the light switches in the Ceramics Studio didn’t have a light switch cover at all. Luckily the Joker swung in to save the day.

jokerplate
Additionally, there were lighters.

lightersfromjason

All these very thoughtful gifts were bestowed upon us at our Spring Festival party where we introduced Sichuan Hot Pot (火锅) to our friends who proved themselves worthy of our friendship by eating a lot. We held the party on February 8, 2014 (aka 2/8/14 Green Lantern Day) so the Green Lantern lighter was especially appropriate. As everyone knows, however, Green Lantern stuff is always an appropriate gift, so we ran into each other again last night at a friend’s party. He and his wife gave my wife and I some buttons (not hand-crafted, but hand-selected)-

buttons

Yeah, the cat one are pretty cute.

Green_Lantern_v.4_24

While WXL is officially a comic book blog, it’s been a while since I addressed an comics-related issue. I’ve been rereading the Green Lantern/Green Lantern Corps, starting with Rebirth. I’ve just finished The Sinestro Corps War and will probably stop after the other Lantern Corps are introduced, but before Blackest Night goes into full swing. It’s hard to read this material without considering the impact that Geoff Johns has had on the Green Lantern and the DC multiverse in general. When Johns and his various and very talented partners-in-crime brought Hal Jordan back as a Green Lantern, he had been possessed by both Parallax and the Spectre, spent a bit of time with the Phantom Stranger, and played a role in bringing about the destruction of both the Green Lantern Corps and his hometown Coast City. In the books leading up to Blackest Night, the GL creative team resolved the matter of Parallax’s infection of Hal somewhat, enabled Hal to shed the Spectre, returned the ring to Hal’s finger, reestablished the Corps and established additional colors, and brought Coast City back from its ashes.

Please don’t take this article too seriously.

Coast City is traditionally depicted as a California city- sometimes it feels like San Diego and sometimes like San Francisco. Its creation fills a void left by Gotham City and Metropolis’s similarities to New York City and Chicago, Star(ling) City’s similarity to Seattle, and the Gem Cities’ similarities to the Twin Cities. In the Silver Age, Coast City embodied much of the essence of California as understood by the American imagination- a little more laid back than the East Coast, but on the edge of the future, cowboys living better through chemistry. More than Metropolis, Coast City was the city of tomorrow. As the 20th century progressed, California dreaming changed its tone and the American imagination adapted, crafting a new vision of what California meant. This new vision reacted to the rise of new subcultures that became closely associated with California- the Beats, hippies, the Manson family, pornographers, Black Panthers, Scientologists, Silicon Valley, People’s Church, Church of Satan, the out gay community, United Fruit Workers, and other strong personalities that informed both California and US identity. Coast City still somewhat resembled San Diego minus the Hispanic population, but it hardly resembled San Francisco by the time it was destroyed in the 1990s. I see Coast City more like Detroit, incredibly optimistic in the Silver Age and ruined largely by outside factors. Detroit came to mind initially because it’s the hometown of Geoff Johns.

Let’s look at what destroyed Coast City and what destroyed Detroit. Once the Oa of automobiles, Detroit’s contribution to US culture and its international reputation has largely been overshadowed by its economic decline. Can you imagine the American experience without Motown or MC5, much less without the automobile? The economy of Coast City when it is first introduced centers around Ferris Aircraft, which isn’t the automobile industry, but both employ machinists, mechanics, and engineers, if you know what I mean. These two industrial cities are destroyed from within and without.

The destruction of Coast City is generally attributed to three individuals:

Mongul loves yellow

Mongul

Is it just me or are there some underlying racial issues with this character? He is a yellow-skinned villain bent on world(s) domination through dynastic rule. His name is one letter away from Mongol, shorthand for Mongoloid (if you subscribe to the antiquated theory of three distinct races (Negroid, Caucasoid, Mongoloid)) which refers to people with ancestry from Asia. He’s built much more like a Mongolian than a Japanese person and his name is likely inspired by the notoriety of the Mongol Empire. In the late 20th century, the failing communist nation of Mongolia posed little threat to Detroit. Japan and its robust automotive industry, however, posed a significant one and that idea continues to find a captive audience. Manufacturing in Asia has only grown as a go-to scapegoat for a decline in US manufacturing. The nations of Japan and Korea developed economically, achieved legitimacy, and consolidated regional influence largely on the backs of their automotive industries. Their rise came at the cost of Detroit.

cyborg superman

Cyborg Superman

As his name implies, Hank Henshaw is a half-human half-robot version of the Man of Steel. In a dangerous partnership with Mongul, Cyborg Superman transforms Coast City literally into an Engine City. Coast City is replaced by an exponentially more industrialized version of itself to serve the ambitions of the foreign power Mongul. Much like Detroit’s woes, there is an undeniable John Henry overtone to the terraforming of Coast City. It’s man vs machine and machine wins.

hal jordan loves jewelry

Hal Jordan

The legacy of Coast City’s destruction is best characterized by its effect on Hal Jordan. Left so distraught by his hometown’s demise, Hal Jordan allows himself to fall victim to Parallax or what FDR might call “fear itself.” The decline of Detroit has certainly taken a toll on the will power of the people of the city and perhaps in some of their darker moments, people have embraced fear over optimism.

When Geoff Johns brings Hal Jordan back to the Green Lantern mantel, he also brings Coast City back into existence. By doing so, I believe Geoff Johns is communicating a hope for his hometown to persevere through difficult times and eventually revitalize itself. In one of this last moves as Green Lantern kingpin, Johns introduced the character of Simon Baz in his native Detroit, providing a much less nuanced role for his hometown than any parallels that could be brought between Coast City and Detroit.

I like when creators represent, whether it’s Johns placing Simon Baz in Detroit or Robert Kirkman setting the Walking Dead in Georgia. Comics can capture physical and spiritual geography in ways unique to the medium such as Strange Attractors, Deogratias, and Palestine. Of course, the Marvel Universe approaches real-life geography in a way distinctly its own.

In conclusion, I would welcome Aquaman to Atlanta. He’s gonna love the fountains at Centennial Park.

bruceleeinterviewsvan

As you probably know, Geoff John’s nearly decade-long run as helmsman for the Green Lantern titles is coming to a close. Green Lantern fans nervously await a new era as all the GL titles receive entirely new creative teams and a new title Larfleeze arrives. When the new creative teams were announced, fans prepared themselves for the transition. The GL fan base was shaken up again by the announcement that Joshua Fialkov would not be writing Green Lantern Corps and Red Lanterns, despite initial announcements that he would. DC demonstrated a high level of cool when picking Fialkov’s replacements, finding two very original voices from independent comics, Van Jensen and Charles Soule.

I had the good fortune of meeting Van Jensen last summer and we’ve eaten hot wings together several times since. When I heard the news that Van was chosen to replace Fialkov, I was excited for both Van and for the Green Lantern Corps. If you’ve seen Van’s previous work the Pinocchio Vampire Slayer series, you might have a hard time imagining this guy writing Green Lantern Corps, but you shouldn’t worry. From talking with Van, it’s clear he takes this responsibility very seriously and is thrilled to be working on the title. Growing up in Nebraska, Van’s access to comics was somewhat limited, but he could always rely on finding G.I. Joe comics and he still carries much affection for the series. Isn’t the Green Lantern really just a story about soldiers fighting vampires? Don’t worry. The Corps is in good hands. Bernard Chang will be delivering what is surely to be some amazing artwork.

Here we offer you our exclusive interview with new Green Lantern writer Van Jensen-

WAYNE XIAOLONG: Over the past decade, the Green Lantern titles have enjoyed tremendous popularity earned through outstanding writing and art. Since Hal Jordan exorcised Parallax and the Green Lantern Corps reformed, a great many iconic characters have been introduced and core elements of the DC multiverse’s quantum mechanics and metaphysics have been defined in the pages of Green Lantern books. Geoff Johns and his buddies pursued nearly absurd limits of grandeur, affecting the entire DC universe in fundamental ways. Your work in Pinocchio, Vampire Slayer has been an intimate series of small town murders while the Green Lantern books have been planet-wide genocides. As a writer, what are some adjustments you’ve been made as you tackle a narrative with consequences that reach pretty far beyond what you’ll write yourself?
VAN JENSEN: The work done by Geoff Johns, Peter Tomasi, Dave Gibbons and so many more is really remarkable, up there with some of the best creative runs that anyone has had in comics. So, first and foremost, I come in knowing that I have huge shoes to fill. I’ve worked to familiarize myself as much as possible with the details and mechanics of this universe, as well as with the complex histories of the characters. The scope of that research is quite a bit beyond what I did for Pinocchio, which relied almost entirely on Carlo Collodi’s original story. A key component is simply thinking on a grand scale about impacts—asking myself: “If this happens, what are the reactions not just within the Corps, but around the universe?” And the last component is working closely with Green Lantern writer Rob Venditti. Luckily, we come into this having been friends for years. Rob is an extremely talented, thoughtful writer, and it’s very easy to work with him.
WAYNE XIAOLONG: You’ve worked with artists long distance successfully before. What are some tips you can give creative partners separated by geography?
VAN JENSEN: The key is simply communicating clearly. Know what your expectation are, hit deadlines and work through problems together. We live in an age when distance isn’t the barrier it once was, so geography never should come between creative partners.

WAYNE XIAOLONG: For Green Lantern Corps, you are working with Bernard Chang. Chang’s style is quite different from Dustin Higgins who you worked with on Pinocchio, Vampire Slayer. Is the process very different with each artist? Any positive surprises working with Chang?

VAN JENSEN: I’ve known and admired Bernard’s work for a long time, and I count myself as extremely lucky to have a chance to work with him (as well as colorist Marcelo Maiolo). One thing I’ve learned is that Bernard is very attuned to storytelling. He asks lots of questions and brings lots of great ideas, making sure that the narrative flows effectively. That’s something that is very true of Dusty as well. So they’re fairly similar to work with, even though they are so different stylistically.
killsuperman
WAYNE XIAOLONG:The internet breathed a sigh of relief when the rumor that you were going to kill John Stewart was put to rest. Many sensitive readers are still recovering from the death of Damian Wayne. Given the chance, how would you kill Superman?

VAN JENSEN: With a spoon.

superafrique

WAYNE XIAOLONG: I think what DC Comics is doing with We Can Be Heroes is really fantastic. What causes are you involved with?

VAN JENSEN: I agree completely. We Can Be Heroes is a great program, and it’s nice to see a company make such a significant effort to make a difference. Mostly, I’m involved with programs local to Atlanta—our Habitat for Humanity chapter, a couple of local homeless shelters and a creative writing mentorship program for kids at inner city schools.
teddyringydingy

WAYNE XIAOLONG: Which U.S. President do you think a Green Lantern ring would have most likely chosen?
VAN JENSEN: I doubt that any president had as much willpower as Teddy Roosevelt, and he would’ve created some totally crazy constructs.

whichringforyou
WAYNE XIAOLONG: Which ring would most likely end up on your finger?
VAN JENSEN: If I’m stuck in Atlanta traffic, definitely Red.
pinocchioredscare

WAYNE XIAOLONG: Which ring would most likely end up on Pinocchio?
VAN JENSEN: Probably Red. That puppet has a lot of anger. And it’s fun to imagine him with an endless supply of stakes AND spewing flaming bile.
%d bloggers like this: