Archives for posts with tag: money

I finished reading God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut yesterday. If you haven’t read it, I strongly encourage it. Some passages are so spot on that one must immediately reread them to make certain such truths actually made it to print. I read my wife’s copy and the book had evidently had a previous owner as well. I don’t know them, but after reading all their notes and seeing the words they underlined, I feel as if I know one thing about them- they really missed the point of the book. Mostly they had underlined words, presumably so they could look them up in the dictionary. The underlined words were either SAT words or words with less relevance outside their time, geography, and experience than within them. The passages that were underlined seemed to be sentences that would’ve agreed the grand old American objectivist Ayn Rand, a woman whose philosophies run counter with the book’s Hamletesque protagonist Eliot Rosewater. The book looks critically at the class system of the United States, both as an institution and in everyday practice. It is particularly sympathetic to the poor, victims of economic turmoil beyond their control and becoming less relevant with the advent of machines. Eliot’s father makes a lot of statements against welfare assistance, social programs, and “obscenity”- these were the statements that the previous reader decorated with meaningless notes like “Well-stated!” Perhaps the saddest part is a little note they wrote to themselves saying “I think Kilgore Trout may have helped write this book. There’s a sentence on the back of book.” As readers of Vonnegut well know, Kilgore Trout is a reoccurring character in his books, a science fiction writer who tells heavy truths in his work, much like the author in Saga. That’s a great comic, Saga. Anyway, it was fun to read this book alongside such an innocent reader that I’ve never met. I’ve consumed a lot of used textbooks, mostly history and philosophy- nonfiction – and I could understand why people underlined and took notes. Nonfiction is much easier to untie than fiction- when you read along with a stranger with a nonfiction work, you can start to see the argument they’re putting together or at least pieces of it. With fiction, you often get people underlining for more sentimental reasons. Sure, they could be literature scholars, but you can tell the difference between a scholar and a sentimental reader. You don’t feel like a peeping tom when you’re sharing research with a scholar- that’ s the transparency that gives our knowledge value. However, reading fiction with a stranger’s notes feels a bit perverted and sparks the engines of imagination and totally unsolicited judgement on the person’s entire being. It’s a love/hate relationship- maybe other people fantasize about meeting that person, sharing their intellectual insights, falling in love, etc. but I just think “What a fucking idiot” every time I see what they underline or read the notes they write. I take those little clues out of context, build an unflattering context around them, and then rule that whoever read the book before me is exactly what’s destroying civilization. It’s worse if you borrow a friend’s book and they’ve underlined all these sappy emotional passages and your imagination forces you to apply it to things in your friend’s life. Or what your mom underlined in 50 Shades of Grey.

Anyway, here are a few different covers that have been used for God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut. Who wore it better?

To Give Eliot Rosewater is twice the lunatic you'll ever be

god bless you winston smith

Fly Hunter god bless you mr rosewater and forget bill murray

V for Vendetta

Stuff My Piggy Bank

Title Page Rave Til Dawn

Three Books One Cup

Sylvia is Ophelia

When I'm An Old Baby

Pigs on wheels Dresden Copy

Mesoamerica Resiste (outside) by the Beehive Collective

Mesoamerica Resiste (outside) by the Beehive Collective

Yesterday I have the privilege of attending one of the Beehive Collective’s touring workshops for their gushingly beautiful and incredibly detailed work ¡Mesoamérica Resiste! which illustrates many of the issues at play in the Plan Pueblo Panama (P.P.P.) or Mesoamerican Integration and Development Project.  The collective put all of their resources to work to craft the piece including numerous illustrators, scientists, and contributions from local people throughout the area affected by the PPP. Two women, Meg and Mandy, toured with the piece and gave thorough explanations of the many themes, metaphors, and assertions of the work. You can learn more about the Beehive Collective and their touring schedule by visiting their site and I strongly encourage that you do.

Mesoamerica Resiste (inside) by the Beehive Collective

Mesoamerica Resiste (inside) by the Beehive Collective

dioesmuertosaurus

Here’s another batch of panda artifacts that I’ve been working on. In the first one, I’m trying out a couple of things. I’ve filled the eye sockets with a red that equally romantic and demonic. Additionally I’ve added some patterns on the face, inspired by the many Dios Los Muertos faces I’ve seen recently, and then I colored the flesh, which I usually leave white, an orange, in hopes of evoking fond tiger spirits.

Fashion meets nature

In this picture, I’m nonchalantly drawing parallels between flowers, hair, and stars. I’m trying to generate a feeling of repetition without actually using repetition, like varying a phrase in music. Nothing heavy.

 

eyore

The color schemes here are taken from Disney’s interpretations of beloved childhood shoe-gazers Winnie the Pooh and his jackass friend Eeyore.

billion$babypanda

This is a picture of Kiwan and Jennie from Billion Dollar Baby, an Atlanta-based musical duo that I met at Wonder Root. One of the first things I noticed about Kiwan was his jewelry, which he wears every day. Those of you who follow this blog will understand why I was immediately attracted to it. Jennie and I were interviewed simultaneously a few weeks back. I’m not sure when it will become available, but I’ll likely let you know. You should keep your eyes and ears peeled for Billion Dollar Baby.

wildbencher

Not much to say here, just a picture dump from some old stuff and some new stuff. The old stuff is in color while the new stuff is in black-and-white, just another example life imitating art. Childhood was a rainbow while the present is grey and the future will be too unless you put the effort in to color it. Who really wants a rainbow anyway? Maybe the rainbow of your childhood was actually rivers of blood, lava, urine, antifreeze, toilet cleaner, and boxed wine sprayed from a sprinkler over your body, paralyzed by the venom of an exotic spider, as you lay in a bowl of spoiled milk and Fruity Pebbles. Childhood can be rough. Rainbows walk a rocky road.

 raingerdanger

One of my favorite people in the world is named Danger and I’m kind of mad at Anthony Weiner for tarnishing his name.

wildbjugs

campaignfinancereform

wildsink

happydeathsuicidebomber

wildfan

differentunderstandings

wildwed

mother

wildgrowthfisherofmen

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