Archives for category: Image Comics

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It’s been nearly a month since I had internet in my home and this site has obviously suffered because of it. You’ve been spared a few comics reviews, so here’s a quick and dirty summary. I started the epic that is Hack/Slash and absolutely lot it. I’m about halfway through the 3rd omnibus. I really enjoyed the collected New 52 Shazam! a lot more than I thought I would. Captain Marvel/Shazam often surprises me- I enjoyed Virtue and Vice and consider Black Adam’s storyline to be the most compelling of 52. I also give thumbs up to New 52’s Wonder Woman vol 3,  as well as indie books The Milkman Murders; New Model Army; Continuity; and a very enthusiastic thumbs up to Jonathan Hickman’s The Nightly News, which does new things for the comic book medium, really a mind-blower.

Without the internet, I’m drawing and reading more- what a surprise!

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To see more pictures from Dragon Con, click HERE

(warning: some pictures might not be suitable for all audiences)

Dragon Con this year went pretty well. I enjoyed nearly every panel which I attended, which was considerably less this year as I volunteered for the first time. As usual, the panels from the academic conference were the most interesting. I must admit I had the most fun at my panel, “Comics Through A Socio-Political Lens.” The other speakers were very nice and delivered witty papers. The crowd was engaging and even included a real life superhero- Jet from the Rock City, Alabama! I got to speak with a lot of artists and writers, such as Neal Adams, Jimmy Palmiotti, Amanda Connor, Brian Stelfreeze, Darwyn Cooke, Van Jensen, and others. Because I was a volunteer, I ended up meeting a lot of movie and TV stars including Malcolm Macdowell, George Takei, Edward James Olmos, and the guy who plays Hank on Grimm. I did feel a bit starstruck meeting the cast of Smallville, especially Allison Mack- talking to her was just like talking to Chloe Sullivan. Supergirl is even more beautiful in real life and Brainiac has been working out. The other volunteers I met were generally nice. Some of them were more interesting than others.

The most interesting person I met wasn’t actually a guest at Dragon Con. I was walking out the Marriott when I spotted a guy wearing a Strange Talent of Luther Strode t-shirt and I complimented him on it. It turns out he’s Tradd Moore and he gave me a copy of Luther Strode Vol. 2, which was pretty sweet.

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To see more pictures from Dragon Con, click HERE

After Dragon Con, I realize that I left two great titles from the past year off the list of best comics. Obviously the omission of Luther Strode is a bit embarrassing and perhaps even a little corrupt in light of his recent generosity, but it’s definitely a book that stood out this year. The other omission is the unreasonably controversial and incredibly well-done Before Watchmen series, which I really feel like rereading after hearing Darwyn Cooke and Amanda Connor talk about it.

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To see more pictures from Dragon Con, click HERE

faceoff

In honor of Wayne Xiao Long now appearing on the social media platform known as Facebook, Wayne Xiao Long is presenting the first Wayne Xiao Long Faceoff. Employing the ancient customs of facing off and offing face, Wayne Xiao Long Faceoffs will pit brother against brother, thesis against antithesis, children against their parents, and, as always, Batman against Bruce Lee. Here in the first Wayne Xiao Long Faceoff, similarly themed graphic novels will duke it out in the arena of Wayne Xiao Long’s personal preferences and refined tastes.

WAR ZOMBIES

’68 vs Graveyard of Empires

If you haven’t read this books, I recommend them both, but who has time to read every war zombie graphic novel? Both stories tell of a zombie outbreak witnessed by American military overseas. From the titles of the texts, you should be able to tell which military action that refer to (1968 was the year of the Tet Offensive and consequential change in thinking about Vietnam while Graveyard of Empires is a nickname for Afghanistan.) ’68 finds the zombies beyond the battlefield, eating brains on the domestic front as well, while Graveyard of Empires features a contained and coordinated zombie infestation that spans the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the U.S. occupation following 9/11. If you’re really short on time, go for Mark Sable and Paul Azaceta’s Graveyard of Empires because it’s a mini-series. While Graveyard of Empires is a great read, ’68 wins this faceoff. Both stories benefit from a lot of research and great art, but Mark Kidwell did more research and the team of Nat Jones and Jay Fotos created better art. One of the main characters in ’68 is an American-Chinese soldier named Yam; he’s fed up with the racist U.S. military, the distrusting local population, and, of course, the zombies- all in all, a very sympathetic character. As much as I like Yam, I’m disappointed with what little attention Kidwell paid to the Chinese language and to the way Chinese people speak pidgin English as he has given Yam’s mom a distinctly Japanese mispronunciation of English. Of course, if you know me or follow this blog, you know I can be a little nit-picky about how China is represented in comics.

WINNER: ’68 by Mark Kidwell, Nat Jones, and Jay Fotos

VAMPIRES OF A DISTINCT NATIONAL CHARACTER

American Vampire vs The New Deadwardians

A faceoff between Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque’s American Vampire and Dan Abnett and I.N.J. Culbard’s The New Deadwardians is not exactly fair. American Vampire is a much longer ongoing work while The New Deadwardians is not. Still The New Deadwardians holds its own as a unique and valuable contribution to vampire literature and as a worthwhile criticism of Edwardian Britain. Both books feature vampires and use vampire mythology to reveal their respective nation’s essences, but they differ in many crucial ways. In The New Deadwardians, the reality of vampires is public knowledge while it remains underground (barely) in the American Vampire series. The New Deadwardians covers a much short time period than American Vampire, which stretches nearly a century from the end of the U.S. Civil War to the tumultuous times that followed the Second World War. Both works are political in nature, but follow something Margaret Thatcher said once about how European politics being compelled by history and American politics being driven by philosophy. The plot of American Vampire, like the American vampires themselves, is driven by the needs of individualism while the plot of The New Deadwardians and the European vampires of American Vampire are much more interested in social control and power than the ideals of freedom or personal justice. Having said that, the suffragettes are my favorite part of The New Deadwardians. If you have the time and resources, I highly recommend reading them both. I also highly recommend sharing comics- my copy of The New Deadwardians is on loan to a Dracula expert at Georgia Tech and I am grateful to my wife’s tallest co-worker for lending me all the American Vampire books, which is a hefty set that all public libraries should carry. Yay, sharing! The final results of this faceoff may be biased by my own totally awesome American-ness, so you should probably just read both titles (and write to DC telling them to put Dan Abnett back on Resurrection Man). Book 4 of American  Vampire is the weakest of the series, but still better than most stuff being published.

WINNER: American Vampire by Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque, with others

REIMAGINED CHILDREN’S STORIES

Peter Panzerfaust vs No Place Like Home

Two of the coolest books being published right now are Kurt Wiebe and Tyler Jenkins’s Peter Panzerfaust and Angelo Tirotto and Richard Jordan’s No Place Like Home, which draw inspiration from J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan and L. Frank Baum’s The Wizard of Oz. Peter Panzerfaust places a charismatic Peter Panzerfaust in World War II France with several lost boys. The book captures the magical excitement and child-like wonder of being an orphan in wartime as Wiebe adeptly pulls your heartstrings and stirs your imagination. Familiar characters like Tinkerbell and the Darlings slowly creep in the fill out this Peter Pan Fan Fiction. If Wiebe and Jenkins can keep up this energy, this comic could be made into a movie that my mom would absolutely love. On the other hand, No Place Like Home could be made into a movie that my mom would absolutely hate. No Place Like Home is a little trashy, much more so than Peter Panzerfaust, but that makes sense- one is a horror comic intended for adults and one is playful historical fiction meant for a wider audience. This difference makes this faceoff a little more difficult, so I’ll return to a myth a friend of mine shared with me back in Dalian:

“Hundreds and hundreds of years ago, a prince was too be married and needed simply to choose his bride. Three candidates were chosen for him and set a challenge before each of them as he directed them to one of many rooms in his palace-

‘Here is one hundred American dollars. You challenge is to fill this room.’

Each candidate left with their challenge and the money the prince had bestowed upon them. While the candidates fetched their materials, the prince and the other members of his court played FIFA Soccer 12.

The first candidate to return brought several bags of gold and put them in the room. The items covered less than one third of the floor.

The second candidate to return brought several Mylar balloons, filling nearly three quarters of the rooms volume.

The third candidate brought a candle, which she placed in the center of the room and lit, filling the room with light.

Who did the prince choose to be his bride? The one with the biggest boobs, of course.”

Using the wisdom from this ancient tale, the winner of this faceoff has been determined.

WINNER: No Place Like Home by Angelo Tirotto and Richard Jordan

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