Archives for category: Art

bolt goggles

Here’s a drawing of my nephew, gazing a gazeless stare. Somebody should give me a grant to make a Ziggy Stardust claymation…

 

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Last night the missus and I headed down to The Goat Farm to check out The Cricket Gallery‘s exhibit featuring animation art from 1990s cartoons including several Nicktoons like Ren and Stimpy, Rugrats, Doug, Aaah! Real Monsters, Rocko’s Modern Life, and Hey Arnold, but also MTV icons Beavis and Butthead as well as Aeon Flux. While the weather was chilly, the response from everyone in attendance was very warm- the crowd  ooh’d and aah’d at all these artifacts from their childhood. Not all of the cartoons made their way to China, but my wife still recognized a lot of them. She would’ve been really happy to see Daria, who she’s fallen a bit in love with since coming to the US, but the cynical Miss Morgendorffer was nowhere to be found.

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The exhibit also features some classic Disney and Warner Bros. cells and sketches.

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There was a good lot of Simpsons sketches, but they weren’t represented on the scale of the Nickelodeon stuff. In addition to the Lisa sketch below, there were sketches of several Simpsons characters. There’s a particularly charming one of Krusty the Clown that I didn’t get a picture of, so you should really go there yourself. It’s free and lasts until November 16.

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Of course, my favorite items in the exhibit feature a certain Caped Crusader and some of the rogues who really came to life in Batman: The Animated Series- Clayface, Two-Face, Joker. The exhibit was great and my only complaint is that it’s a little small considering the size of the Cricket Gallery collection and the size of the venue- also, how could you display Batman: TAS stuff and not include any Harley Quinn item?

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I’ll be the first to admit that these photos don’t do any of the pieces justice. I forgot my proper camera and just took there with my phone. You should go to the exhibit yourself anyway. Like I said, it’s free and lasts  until November 16. I hope the Cricket Gallery will share more of their collection in the future.

 

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I had the pleasure and privilege to join fellow Atlanta artists Laura Asherman, Peter Brooks, Chandler Cox, Kelly Crosby, Crystal Desai, Larry Holland, Hillary Jourdan, Nick Madden, Sara Santamaria, and Dallas Ward as part of WonderRoot Gallery’s Members Only exhibition which runs from July 24 to September 9 at WonderRoot Community Arts Center in Reynoldstown. I had to miss the opening because I had to work, but the missus and I went over there this morning to check out the exhibit. I know a couple of the other artists, but hadn’t seen work by many of them before. It’s a variety of mediums, crafts, and sizes that come together nicely. I had hoped to post a few pictures of the exhibit, but this morning was a very busy time for the arts center. In the gallery, aspiring dramatists awaited their auditions for a casting call downstairs while a candle-making class took up most of the gallery and the entire building shook with the live drums coming from the recording studio. It was a little too cramped and all the actors were sitting underneath the pieces so it would’ve been presumptuously invasive of me to start snapping photos. If you live in Atlanta, I definitely encourage you to check it out.

Here’s a picture of my piece:

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Here’s another batch of panda artifacts that I’ve been working on. In the first one, I’m trying out a couple of things. I’ve filled the eye sockets with a red that equally romantic and demonic. Additionally I’ve added some patterns on the face, inspired by the many Dios Los Muertos faces I’ve seen recently, and then I colored the flesh, which I usually leave white, an orange, in hopes of evoking fond tiger spirits.

Fashion meets nature

In this picture, I’m nonchalantly drawing parallels between flowers, hair, and stars. I’m trying to generate a feeling of repetition without actually using repetition, like varying a phrase in music. Nothing heavy.

 

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The color schemes here are taken from Disney’s interpretations of beloved childhood shoe-gazers Winnie the Pooh and his jackass friend Eeyore.

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This is a picture of Kiwan and Jennie from Billion Dollar Baby, an Atlanta-based musical duo that I met at Wonder Root. One of the first things I noticed about Kiwan was his jewelry, which he wears every day. Those of you who follow this blog will understand why I was immediately attracted to it. Jennie and I were interviewed simultaneously a few weeks back. I’m not sure when it will become available, but I’ll likely let you know. You should keep your eyes and ears peeled for Billion Dollar Baby.

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Both of these images are based on photographs I took at the Gay Pride Parade two weeks ago in Atlanta. The parade was mostly corporate sponsors and churches, but luckily there were a few truly fabulous souls to keep parade attendees from falling asleep like those sexy firemen from Swinging Richard’s. During the parade, I saw a lot of individuals who identified themselves as “bears.” I may need to infiltrate this community for the purposes of finding models for my pictures. Seriously, who makes a better panda than a bear?

Also I can’t take credit for the paisley pattern in the first picture. I just grabbed that the ol’ internet. I probably won’t stick with it as I’m trying to work solely from my own imagination and photographs, but I think it looks good so I thought I’d share it here. I wish somebody would invent a good paisley generator where you contribute a few squiggles and a robot transforms your input into beautifully detailed, yet unassumingly elegant patterns.

Last weekend, I attended the Little 5 Points Halloween Parade. There was an army of David Bowies from various points in his career and a very tall Godzilla that breathed smoke. Perhaps the strangest sight was a van covered in a full graphic wrap featuring premium strands of marijuana and they were distributing medical marijuana lollipops to raise awareness of attempts to decriminalize and legalize marijuana. Other advocates for marijuana’s legalization made their voices heard at the parade, but this van was truly something out of the ordinary. I expected the driver to pull off her mask to reveal McGruff the crime dog, but that didn’t happen. Maybe she took the mask off later.

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It’s been nearly a month since I had internet in my home and this site has obviously suffered because of it. You’ve been spared a few comics reviews, so here’s a quick and dirty summary. I started the epic that is Hack/Slash and absolutely lot it. I’m about halfway through the 3rd omnibus. I really enjoyed the collected New 52 Shazam! a lot more than I thought I would. Captain Marvel/Shazam often surprises me- I enjoyed Virtue and Vice and consider Black Adam’s storyline to be the most compelling of 52. I also give thumbs up to New 52’s Wonder Woman vol 3,  as well as indie books The Milkman Murders; New Model Army; Continuity; and a very enthusiastic thumbs up to Jonathan Hickman’s The Nightly News, which does new things for the comic book medium, really a mind-blower.

Without the internet, I’m drawing and reading more- what a surprise!

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I’ve been volunteering at Wonder Root Community Arts Center in the Reynoldstown neighborhood of Atlanta for the past few months. It’s a great place that offers a recording studio, performance venue, darkroom, digital media lab, art gallery, and community garden to its members for a very low rate ($10 a month or $60 a year) and it also participates in scores of community programs and activities. I drew the picture of the center above and it now hangs in the Wonder Root community library, which houses a lot of issues of ArtPapers, many rare art publications, and a cigarette machine turned art dispenser. Last week I was asked to draw a picture on the door, which the center has been sporting for a few days so far. While chalk has frustrated me as a medium, particularly when I was teaching, I managed to make a friendly doodle that I figured I’d share with y’all. It contains elements of Wonder and elements of Panda.

Wonderwoman Panda Door

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Wonder Root Wonder Panda

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The cosplay phenomenon manifested itself, mostly at a grassroots level, from the collision of social forces old and new. Equal parts post-modern hyper-consumerism and ancient ritual, cosplay combines humanity’s celebration of its own imagination and a refusal to accept its natural limits. Like mating dances and funeral marches, it is inherently sexual with its multiple sexual identities decided by its multiple audiences. Through cosplay, the cosplayer rejects their reality in favor of a reality augmented by a fantasy element. The act is both self-destructive and self-affirming. It is both personal and social. During the act, the cosplayer is constantly engaging the character being recreated and through this process, an intimacy is created. For fans of those character, observing others in the cosplay act can stimulate their own feelings of intimacy will the character, exponentially increasing the Barthesian experience of an author losing control of their work while the audience creates its own text from its own understanding of the work. People are attracted to the cosplay community because of the orgy of it all, the give and take of cerebral and sexual signs that compel visceral responses from the intellectual and physiological self.

Cosplay is real people, but it isn’t. The characters are generally more professional than the actors. Cosplay succeeds when it blurs the lines between its multiple realities in interesting ways. Lex Luthor is obvious in the Prometheus suit, but what about his birthday suit? Craftsmanship, creativity, and courage are characteristics that greatly benefit a cosplayer. Veidt.com is a unique voice in the cosplayer universe. Describing themselves as “a stupid little fansite celebrating alt cosplay, post-human culture, and parody,” Veidt offers what a lot of people are looking for in their cosplay- nudity. Veidt is not a pornographic site, but it will likely stir a few of those feelings you discovered during puberty. In addition to its erotic character, Veidt maintains a minimalist aesthetic more John Waters than Andrew Blake, punker than it is pretty.

Additionally, Veidt stands on the merits of its own street credibility or rather its geekdom authenticity. Named after the ozziest of the Watchmen, Veidt demonstrates flawlessly a genuine interest and understanding of comics’ rich culture without the need to boast Comic-Book-Guy-style about its own authority. At a time when an embarrassing number of males in the sci-fi community are attacking females in the community under the ridiculous charge of being fake nerds, Veidt is a site maintained by women that are real nerds- I mean that as a compliment, of course. Sure, you will find Supergirl and Catwoman on their site, but also several Green Lanterns (even a pre-Red Lantern Green Lantern), characters from independent comics, characters of their own creation, and other characters of varying obscurity.

Anyway, I spoke with some of the ladies at Veidt.com and did a few Wayne Xiao Long interpretations of some of their photos. I encourage you to check out their site to see what it is these remarkable women do.

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INTERVIEW WITH THE WOMEN OF VEIDT.COM

WXL: Who are you?

VEIDT.COM: I’m the concept artist behind the alt cosplay site Veidt.com, which encompasses pretty much everything on there, except for the part that actually matters- wearing the costumes.

WXL: You maintain a site that features pop culture news and your opinions, but is mainly known for featuring beautiful and beautifully tattooed women dressed as characters from video games, comic books, and your own imagination. Unlike many other cosplay sites, yours sometimes offers a more intimate look at the bodies of the cosplay models. It’s a very popular site that doesn’t generate income, right? So, my question is, why do you do it?

VEIDT.COM: This was never intended as a for-profit venture, it’s a silly little art project that’s somehow developed a following. There are very definitely real costs to the stuff we do, but have been quite fortunate that whenever we put up a crowdfunding campaign to keep going, the audience has responded. I’m so grateful for their interest and support, which has allowed us to continue growing.

That’s not to suggest there’s anything wrong with generating revenue. I’m very much a fan of capitalism, and will do other things, but I’d like to keep Veidt as freely available as I can, for the foreseeable.

WXL: Your site gives the impression that all of you are friends. How did you meet each other?

VEIDT.COM: There’s definitely a couple of interesting stories there.

People seem to have a lot of distinct impressions about the site and I kinda like that it’s open to interpretation. As long as they know the shoots are very much a collaboration, and that the best ideas often aren’t coming from me, they can think whatever they like.

I am working right now on a story that combines some of the history and experiences of the site, as a foundation for some radical leaps of imagination, to do something I haven’t seen in comics. Ideally, would love to find the right artist to work with, and make it an open-ended one-off comic book. But if not, I suppose it will go out at some point as a prose piece, with supplemental sketches and photos.

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WXL: Two characters your site is particularly fond of recreating are the Green Lantern characters Star Sapphire and Arisia Rrab. These are both characters under the thumb of Hal Jordan in pretty demeaning ways. By becoming Star Sapphire, any of Carol Ferris’s personality other than her love for Hal ceases to exist, revealing a very outdated perception of women. Arisia Rrab is Hal Jordan’s thirteen year-old girlfriend that alters her appearance to allow Hal to continue his pedophilia when they return to Earth. These women surrender control and even meaning over their lives to a man so easily and yet the models on your site seem to have taken a great deal of control over how they use their bodies and they allow themselves to be publicly represented. Was this a conscious choice to use such characters? More generally, what are your intellectual objectives with the site? How do you define the feminist components of your work? What is your contribution to our collective and your individual struggles with gender?

VEIDT.COM: It’s even weirder, as Hal Jordan doesn’t really mean anything to me. The first DC series I devoured, outside of some Batman books, was Grant Morrison’s JLA, which had Kyle Rayner. That lead me to track down the Keith Giffen run, which came highly recommended, and that’s wall to wall Guy Gardener. And then the JL cartoon was John Stewart…all of those characters had great moments, and strong personalities, so when all of the focus seemed to suddenly shift to Hal Jordan, I didn’t get it. I have no idea what’s supposed to make him better than these other guys, and in fact my biggest exposure to Hal was the pacifist fighter pilot nonsense in the beginning of The New Frontier, and that almost made me stop reading- fortunately, I persevered through…it is an exceptional story.

Very aware of the back-stories of Arisia and Star Sapphire, and would love to go off on a screed about Arisia, in particular, but I’ve actually channeled my reactions to and fascination with that character into the more fictional aspect of the story I mentioned working on. Don’t want to spoil that, but I hope it makes for an interesting / alternate / unexpected take on an utterly absurd, yet compelling character.

As for our cosplay shoots inspired by these characters, there’s definitely a degree of satire by exaggeration behind them. Also, one of the motivations for the images was to try to channel some of the comic book, post-human world into our mundane reality. I don’t think I’ve succeeded at conveying that, as the most consistent criticism is of things like power outlets and light switches in the background. That was kind of the point, and I guess I fail at subtext for having to come out and explain it.

And while I appreciate the question on intellectual objectives, I haven’t earned that. I got accepted to CalArts after hs, but didn’t get to go (parents wouldn’t pay for art school.), made and maintained friendships with some people there, though, and because I had an outsider perspective, was able to see how uncomfortable it could get when people spoke way too much about their process. Not taking your work too seriously, I think that’s actually admirable, and can be an asset. But radically overestimating the audience’s interest in the people behind the work, or being an obv try-hard at personal brand building, is just…*shudder.*

I’ve gotten some fascinating feedback from all kinds of people, who’ve noted many things that were, and many that definitely weren’t, intentional. I appreciate getting people’s responses to this stuff.

WXL: Your site celebrates women in comic books and satisfies a desire than many people have. Most people that search for my site end up here because they were looking for naked pictures of Zatanna or some other comic book femme. It’s great they have your site for stuff like that. Are there any male comic book characters that you like to create costumes for and shoot pictures of?

VEIDT.COM: Well, I’m not short on volunteers, which is nice.

We actually did one this year, a Namor shoot for April Fool’s. A friend of mine has achieved some real fame in a particular niche, and he’s got the classic olympic swimmer’s build, so we did this…intending it to be a joke, but it actually turned out kind of amazing. Rarely look at my stuff and think, there’s a shot that could actually sell as a print, or something, but this set had one.

Sadly, someone close to him didn’t appreciate it, and I was asked to sit on them. That’s happened before, someone asking not to run certain pictures, which is fine, but this one kinda hurt.

If I don’t get the okay to use them soon, I’ll try reshooting it with someone else, as the costume and location really worked, and I’m curious to see what kind of reaction the pics might get on the site. We’ve gotten positive feedback from a pretty diverse array of people, so I’m hopeful some might be open to it.

Either way, there’s at least one other idea I has incorporating a male character; will get that done this summer, too.

WXL: Many of your shoots are in rather public locations. Could you share some interesting encounters with or reactions from the general population? Anyone cast a hex or proposition you?

VEIDT.COM: My favorite thing in the world is going hiking, really late at night. Running up and down hills, climbing and jumping like an idiot, it’s very effective for stimulating introspection and creative thought. Started doing it at night because when I’d go during the day, would occasionally run into another hiker, and that took me out of the moment, and tended to made me self-conscious. I bring this up to sort-of convey that I try to avoid people, generally, no matter what I’m doing. [And should the updates on the site abruptly stop, I’m likely dead somewhere in the Santa Monica mountains, or thereabouts. Hiking at night is very fun, but also dangerous and dumb. It’s cool, though, I will have gone out doing what I loved.

So yeah,  we have used public locations, but I’ve studied them in advance, and felt confident we could work there without running into anyone. It doesn’t always work out that way, though. We were shooting on a fire escape, once, and gradually became aware of this squat little guy masturbating from his window in the adjacent building, with a big smile on his face. We waved, and quickly went elsewhere.

It was a little surreal going into a comic store in LA, not long ago, and a couple people were looking at the Post-Human Pin-Up ebook on an iPad. They were going through it, occasionally talking about it, and I’m 3 feet away listening intently, having that comic book moment where Peter Parker has the imaginary half Spider-Man mask on his face, or Bruce Wayne’s shadow suddenly has bat ears, or whatever.

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WXL: I’m guessing that all of the models on your site have thought about this question before. Which comic book character do you think you personally could portray best on screen?

MARNIE: Cassie Hack, mofo!
HAN:  We just did Ravager, she’s the character i most wanted to do. Please, somebody, just make a Titans movie.

WXL: GL fan to GL fan, what do you think is the number one problem with the movie? Don’t say the costume- that’s a cop-out answer for a cosplayer!

VEIDT.COM: Number one problem? Radical over-reliance on ugly CG, and the costume is part of that, but so are the uninspired designs for Oa, Kilowog Potatohead, Parallax, and so many other elements.

But even if you somehow fixed all that, you still have the choice of Hector Hammond as a villain, the charisma vacuum that is Peter Sarsgaard, casting Blake Lively in a role that screamed out for Eva Green, the implausibility of Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively, and Sarsgaard as a peer group with a long history, things like the GL oath and Kilowog saying,”Poozer”, which read fine on a comic page, but should probably never be spoken aloud in a film. Why was Tim Robbins in this movie? Bland music that made no impression. Also, no Arisia and no fleeting glimpse of Ferris as her future alter ego.

What it did right is a much shorter list: Ryan Reynolds wasn’t bad casting; at least someone thought to start hinting at a larger shared universe by bringing in Amanda Waller; and Mark Strong was pretty good. Happy we got to see him in Sinestro Corps mode for a few seconds.

GO VISIT VEIDT.COM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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