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Jeffrey Bützer is a living musical treasure. For years, he’s been crafting sounds that transform the environment around them. He employs a wide arsenal of instruments and has played with some really talented folks. I first met Jeff back in the twentieth century when we were both working at an extremely corrupt discount movie theater that has since closed. I had the pleasure of playing with him once. I don’t remember much of what we played, but I do remember he espousing an ambition to play more swamp rock. Since then, his music has only gotten more sophisticated. You should check out his music, join the cool kids for a celebration of the release of his new album “Collapsible” at the Goat Farm, and enjoy our interview with the maestro himself.

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INTERVIEW WITH JEFFREY BÜTZER

WXL: You have a new record coming out on June 29th. You must be very excited. What’s the newest thing about your new album?

JEFFREY BÜTZER:
Yes, I do and yes, I am. The most noticible difference is the addition of vocals on 90% of it by the very talented Cassi Costoulas (who has joined our band) and Lionel Fondelville (from France). He wrote most of the lyrics as well. Other than that I would say  the biggest difference is the direction I am trying to take as a composer. Moving
away from the clunkier, Oom-PA, Tom Wait-ish approach I kind of took with my first record, (and spilling into the following one). I am listening and drawing influence from more dream-pop, French folk and French-pop on my newer tunes.

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WXL: You are celebrating your album’s release with a performance at the Goat Farm, one of Atlanta’s most unique venues and a good fit for your music. What is your favorite venue in Atlanta?

JEFFREY BÜTZER: For rock shows I always love the EARL. But The Goat Farm is probably my all around favorite place in Atl right now. They are so supportive of artist. It is exactly what the City needed.

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WXL: Your music appeals to an international audience and you draw from the traditions of many different cultures to create your unique sound. Are there any places in the world that you dream of playing? Is there any exotic instrument that you’re dying to get your hands on?

JEFFREY BÜTZER: I would love to play in Spain, Italy, and Japan. We’ve been fortunate to get to play over seas a few times, but never in any of those destinations. There aren’t really too many instruments on my “want” list right now. I would love a Celeste if anyone has one lying around.

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WXL: If you were a superhero in the DC Universe, which villain from that universe do you think would make the most appropriate nemesis for you?

JEFFREY BÜTZER:  Oh boy, I don’t know my DC universe too well. Most likely whatever
villain can destroy what little time I have to myself these days. OR, I think everyone would like to fight Bizarro, right?

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WXL: One of the most sincere compliments I could give your music is that its intelligence is apparent by how readily it brings to mind thoughts of death and romance. In addition to your extraordinary musical talents, you have some expertise in film.  What are your favorite cinematic death scenes and cinematic romance scenes? Also can you recommend films that you believe combine the two concepts in poignant ways?

JEFFREY BÜTZER: First off, thank you for the compliment. That is tough? There are so many great death scenes. I like Belle De Jour, Dead Man, A Zed and Two Noughts. I love the sugguestion at the end of one of my favorite recent films, A Serious Man. Romantic scenes, the first one that pops in my head is the phone call scene in Before Sunrise, to me that is one of the purist romances on film. As far as recommendations for films that combine both…that is hard. I think Peter Greenaway in his own detached way deals with both in an interesting way. For lighter fare, the recent French romantic- comedy Delicasy is pretty good!

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