wondermatt

Atlanta’s Synchronicity Theatre  will be presenting Carson Kreitzer’s Lasso of Truth, a play about Wonder Woman and her creator William Moulton Marston. The play will run from September 26-October 19, 2014 at the Synchronicity Theatre’s new location at Peachtree Pointe 1545 Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia. The World’s Second Greatest Detective asked Matt Myers, one of the actors performing in the production.

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WXL: Briefly describe your role in Lasso of Truth.

MATT MYERS: I play Guy, who is the owner of a comic store in the 90s. He’s an artist himself, having learned to draw partially from reading Wonder Woman comics, and partially from going to the Rhode Island School of Design. He’s minding his own business one day, when in walks a girl bent on owning the first appearance of Wonder Woman (All-Star Comics #8), and thus his life is changed forever.

It’s a really interesting take on Wonder Woman’s origins and some pretty cool storytelling elements in there. And I get to play a comic shop owner who is not like Comic-Book Guy on the Simpsons.

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WXL: What are some of the differences between theatre and comic books as story-telling mediums?

MATT: The luxury of comic books is that you can accentuate things with closeups and angles and using the visual language of comics to convey information very quickly. No closeups in theatre, unless we run at the audience suddenly, or angle changes unless we move the stage. I’m only half joking on that. But theatre has its own conventions to fall back on. Music, sound design, lighting; that can make it a more visceral experience. Both mediums have their own ways of letting you into the minds of the characters, thought-bubbles versus soliloquy. Comics are (generally) a one reader at a time experience, while everyone is experiencing theatre together, so both offer there own types of intimacy with an audience. Honestly, I think they’re more similar than different, though, just from pacing and the types of stories we tell and the types of people who are drawn to them.

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WXL: Personally I’ve grown very attached to Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang’s work on Wonder Woman and feel nervous about the Finches taking over the title. Azzarello and Chiang had Wonder Woman standing nearly outside of the DC universe and the Finches intend to tie the title more closely with events with the DC universe as whole. Likewise Wonder Woman will make her first appearance on the silver screen in Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice. Do you prefer Wonder Woman as a stand alone character or as part of the larger DC universe? How do you see her involvement with the larger DC universe affect her and her strength as a character?

MATT: For total transparency, I haven’t really read Wonder Woman since John Byrne rebooted her, and before that, George Perez. Guess I’m dating myself there.

We were discussing at rehearsal the other night why Wonder Woman is a difficult character to write. She’s not only Iconic, but Symbolic. So you can tinker around with the iconic characters (and Lord knows they have) but her symbolism and significance makes it hard to do as much with her. Folks get ticky when you deviate too far from form with her. Look no further than David Finch saying they weren’t focusing on the feminism of Wonder Woman. Folks get upset. Even folks who may not have read Wonder Woman recently or ever. She’s that important, Symbolically. And someone has to keep that torch lit.

So all of that to say, I think it’s important that there’s a Wonder Woman in the DC universe and that the other characters show her reverence.  It’s a small but important thing. If Batman and Superman treat her as their equal and not like an equivalent to Aquaman (sorry, Aquaman fans) or the JLA admin (sorry, Flash fans), it’s better for the character. There is no other female character in comics with her kind of cache and power. Still, I understand wanting to give her some distance from the rest of the universe because that frees her up from some of that baggage.

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WXL: When the New 52 launched in September 2011, Azzarello and Chiang received a lot of flack for changing Wonder Woman’s origin from daughter of clay to daughter of Zeus. Many critics felt a certain degree of her essence came from her fatherless origins. Having worked with the character’s real life origins and Marston’s own challenges to gender meaning for Lasso of Truth, how important is this detail of Wonder Woman’s origin to you?

MATT: Hmm, that’s an interesting question. Never really thought about it. But you know, since you brought it up, I think it is important to the character that she didn’t have a male authority figure. It keeps her from having to kowtow to a man, for anyone to have sovereign over her. Zeus is the big boss and all the mythological guys have to bow to him, but Hippolyta seemed a bit more of a guiding force, rather than a vindictive one. In theory, I preferred their relationship. Granted, all of these characters could be much different now than I’m remembering them, as the characters continue to evolve whether I read them or don’t, but I imagine they’ve stayed similar. Wonder Woman bows to no man.

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WXL: Do you believe Marston’s ideas are still present in the character of Wonder Woman?

MATT: Absolutely. She is the standard-bearer for female superheroes. In any incarnation of her, they always have her strength, fortitude and force of will. These are key to her. He wanted to show that strength and femininity are not at odds with each other and she does that.

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WXL: Which DC Comics superhero do you believe is best suited to play Hamlet?

MATT:  I guess the obvious answer is Batman. The death of a loved one causes them to become single-mindedly focused on vengeance, taking their own sanity into doubt at times, and using cunning to defeat the wrongdoers. Maybe Green Arrow? Both of those guys can dwell in the dark places that Hamlet has to go. I guess that makes Claudius Ra’s Al Ghul.

Ooh, I would add that Essential Theatre did a show called Bat-Hamlet a few years ago, that focused on exactly that.It seemed to lend itself more to the Adam West Batman but it followed the train of thought you’re talking about.

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WXL: What are you reading?

MATT: I’m reading She-Hulk, Nightcrawler, Afterlife with Archie, Astro City, and Saga. I go in and out of reading Walking Dead and Invincible and have lately mulled over catching back up on Fables. It’s hard for me to keep up with single issues so I mostly do trades these days.

 

tinysunrise

I think both of these pieces came out pretty well, each creating a distinct scene. In the top one, I hear a soundtrack that crosses the soundtrack of Silence of the Lambs- that bit where the Buffalo peacocks- and Edward Elgar’s Pomp of Circumstance march, livening up the percussion crew Mickey Hart employed to score Apocalypse Now, perhaps with bass powerful enough to shake lava out of distance volcanoes despite being a distance fatally far from the ears of someone who might sympathize with your screams. It would be a party. Le génie de Mal, my dear friends. Or as the Lizard King, not a far cry from the Macho King, once said: “This place has everything. Pills, girls, grass. C’mon, I’ll show you.”

 

tinycatmonk

This one’s shooting more for a tranquility in passing, the half-smile from a stranger that feels like a Valium or when you hear a violin played underground- this music would be much softer, but no less intense- David Borden meeting up with  Francisco Tarrega in a zen garden in the year 5000 where the lines between analog and digital, man and woman, life and death have been blurred so harmoniously that prayers and giggles set an unpredictable beat- so unpredictable anyone can follow along.

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For the second year, the World’s Second Greatest Detective presents an assessment of the comics I’ve read, awarding accolades to books that impressed me. Like last year’s list, this one comes at the beginning of September because my comics year begins and ends with Dragon Con in Atlanta. A lot of titles that I mentioned last year continue to turn out great work: Saga, Revival, Batman, Manhattan Projects- but I’d rather steer attention to titles that didn’t make last year’s list either because of my ignorance, their slow creep to trade, or the fact they didn’t exist last year. There will also be some categories this year. For example:

Best Comic Book Character portrayed in an animation

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Katana in “Beware the Batman”

I should remind you that I don’t read any Marvel books, though the announcement that Charles Soule is leaving all his DC titles and the particular temptation of his Death of Wolverine has me eying the other side of the fence a bit. My decision to abstain from Marvel Comics is sort of arbitrary, but not totally without reason- limits on time and resource do not permit me the luxury of reading every comic book, so I picked one of the big two companies and don’t read the other at all. Though I do read a lot of independent comics and that’s really where my heart belongs. I picked DC over Marvel because of many reasons, but the simplest is Batman.

Not all of the accolades will categorized. Nor may all those mentioned really be ‘comics of 2014′ in the truest sense. For example, thanks to a generous donation by Oni Press to the WonderRoot Jackie Ormes Comic Book Library. I had the privilege to read two series that knocked my socks off:

courtneycrumrinhasaposse

Courtney Crumrin is the fun story about a misanthropic little girl who lives a society worth hating, but luckily finds an uneasy friendship with her witch uncle and a few easier friendships with netherbeasts. It’s a clever book and the content is acceptable for most age levels.

sixthgun

The Sixth Gun is an epic story set in a very Wild West, shaped by all sorts of occult and heebie jeebie ghost stuff. Cullen Bunn and the other creators of The Sixth Gun have moved onto other things and the news that DC would cancel All Star Western saddened me a little. East of West is still kicking around, but 2014 has  introduced a Western title that I may enjoy more than all three of those titles.

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Pretty Deadly contains some amazing art. Much like the best work of J.H. Williams III or Francis Manpaul, Emma Rios’s artwork stands out for her creative use of the medium. Panels and pages work together to create a fantastic pace. As Kelly Sue Deconnick’s writing takes the story in and out of stories and timelines, the art and especially the coloring distinguish the different parts of the whole quite well. Deconnick opened the Comics and Popular Arts Conference at this year’s Dragon Con with a rousing talk touching on a variety of subjects such as how we learn publicly and with record in a fast-paced technological society and how that empowers a ‘gotcha culture’ which in turn hinders our ability to learn; the use of the white male as the default character; the futility of overly emotional and aggressive responses to opposing ideas; and comic books. Her husband writes a pretty good comic too.

doing it and doing it and doing it well

Sex Criminals is a twist on Bonnie and Clyde, Robin Hood, Out of this World, 9 Songs, the Matrix, A Dirty Shame…and yeah, it isn’t. It’s an incredibly original story about a girl who stops time when she orgasms and a boy who also stops time when he orgasms. They discover this shared ability during the act of coitus and put it to good use, robbing banks to raise money for a library under attack by a viciously greedy bank that the boy happens to work for and where he poops in his boss’s office plant once a day.

Another catergory?

Worst Comic Book Character portrayed in an animation

For the video game-inspired animated movie Batman: Assault on Arkham, a bit of a revolution for the animated superhero movie with its Guy Ritchie-like pace, excessive profanity, explicit sexuality, and a level of violence exceeding even last year’s The Dark Knight Returns, DC made a Suicide Squad movie under the guise of a Batman movie. One thing I like about it is how they retained the original physical attributes of Amanda Waller instead going for the Angela Bassett model. One thing I didn’t like is how they turned King Shark from this:

Joker lipstick on a shark

King Shark in the comics to:

james bond jaws joins suicide swaud

King Shark in Batman: Assault on Arkham

He looks a cross between Bane and Jaws from The Spy Who Loved Me. Their motivation for desharking the shark is unclear to me. I also don’t understand why David Goyer wants to demartian the Martian Manhunter.

Best Comic Book Companion to a video game

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Injustice: Gods Among Us begins before the video game’s storyline. In the simplest terms, Joker has tricked Superman into killing Lois Lane who is pregnant with Superman’s baby. Superman gets so mad that he kills the Joker, beginning the fascist reign of Superman and a doting Wonder Woman. Because it is an Elsworlds story with so many DC characters involved, the opportunities for bringing the essences and flaws of these characters abound. Tom Taylor wastes none of them. The Bat family is especially well-done is the book- particularly Alfred and Catwoman.

Best Art in a Superhero Comic Book

jaelesssupermanbatman

Jae Lee did some of the best work of his career during his time on Grag Pak’s Batman/Superman. Of all the superstar artists from the 1990s that have continued in comics, I think the development of Jae Lee’s work has been the most interesting to watch. If you haven’t seen his work on Before Watchmen: Ozymandias, I highly recommend that one too. Batman/Superman is a dreamy book, but it is not without a strong sense of character and expression. This collaboration between Pak and Lee stands out as a triumph in comic storytelling.

Second Attempt That Makes The Most Sense in the New 52

Giving Deathstroke another chance at having his own title. Also looking forward to Gail Simone returning to her Secret Six roots later this year.

Second Attempt That Makes The Least Sense in the New 52

Why are the Teen Titans starting over again with issue 1?

Best Volume 3 collection of the New 52

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Grant Morrison’s run on Action Comics fulfilled its own prophecies in Vol. 3: At The End Of  Days. Morrison’s writes for the long haul and sometimes it works really well (Seven Soldiers of Victory, All-Star Superman, the epic story of Damian Wayne, Doom Patrol, Filth). His eighteen issues on Action Comics is separated into three acts, best illustrated by their separate trade collections. Vol. 1: Superman and the Men of Steel comes off as a pretty typical superhero comic- it’s action-packed and reintroduces many classic characters from Superman’s mythology such as Lex Luthor, Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen, Metallo (Metal-Zero), and Brainiac. There are few weirdo moments, typical of Morrison’s work, but don’t overpower the straight-forward superhero elements. Vol. 2: Bulletproof is pretty weird, more distinctly Morrison. The story is all over the place, referencing itself, making the most out of the queer moments from Vol. 1: Superman and the Men of Steel, as well as introducing a Barack Obama doppelganger named Calvin Ellis- another dimension’s Superman. Finally, in Vol. 3: At the End of Days, all the kookiness starts to make sense and the details of Clark’s arrival in Metropolis in Vol. 1 become enriched by a Myxlplyxian plot that satisfies the patient reader.

Best Vol. 4 Collection(s) of the New 52

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While The Flash Vol. 4: Reverse, Wonder Woman Vol. 4: War, and Batwoman Vol. 4: The Blood is Thick all continued runs by outstanding creative teams, it is books like the Green Lantern family of books, Justice League Dark, and Green Arrow that have seen new creators come in and take the books in different directions to which I’d like to draw your attention. Much praise has been tossed to Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s Green Arrow, collected in Green Arrow Vol. 4: The Kill Machine. The art distinguishes itself from the unofficial DC house-style and the writing invigorates Oliver Queen as a character. I do think that in praising Lemire and Sorrentino’s work, a lot of undeserved criticism has been thrown Ann Nocenti’s way. Her depiction of Oliver Queen as an Ugly American in the People’s Republic of China is one of my favorite instances of seeing China portrayed in a superhero comic. Jim DeMatteis has seemingly inherited the Dark family of DC titles, emerging from his run on The Phantom Stranger. In Justice League Dark Vol. 4: Rebirth of Evil, he takes over for Lemire- moving the story from Trinity War to Forever Evil territory. The little demon Constantine‘s are great, but I wouldn’t have minded a bit more Frankenstein, my favorite member of the Justice League Dark. With the announcement of Charles Soule signing an exclusive contract with Marvel, I expect DeMatteis may take over Swamp Thing, which had a good, but short Vol. 4: Seeder. Matteis does interesting things with the character in Justice League Dark, but if I was going to pick the new writer of Swamp Thing, I’d go for either Tim Seeley, Kurtis Wiebe, or Angelo Tirrotto. To write an Animal Man title despite his joining Justice League United, I’d recruit Corinna Sara Bechko or Joshua Ortega with the instructions to keep Animal Man dark. Finally, the new slew of Green Lantern creators gave the ring-slingers an exciting year. Ranked best to least best: Red Lanterns, Green Lantern, Green Lantern Corps, Green Lantern: New Guardians. Outside of those Vol. 4s, I was disappointed with the Larfleeze title, but look forward to Cullen Bunn’s Sinestro.

Best Non-Picture Book Author to Write a Picture Book

the boys are dead and girl just wanna have fun

Toby Litt on Dead Boy Detectives

When I lived in Ireland, I discovered the work of Toby Litt, an author whose work was not available in the United States, and absolutely fell in love with it. Deadkidsongs, in particular, left me creeped out and inspired. When I heard he would be rebooting the Vertigo series Dead Boy Detectives I waiting in hefty anticipation for the trade to be released. While I was not disappointed, I must admit that Litt has not taken to the medium as quickly as the likes of Brad Meltzer who blew the comics world away with Identity Crisis. I do however see great potential in the future comics work of Litt as he adapts to the medium. Reading the trade, you can see him become more comfortable and, in turn, more capable.

Best Superhero Live-Action Movie

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X-Men: Days of Future Past, like its predecessors, stands well above the rest of the Marvel movies (with the possible exception of Captain America: Winter Soldier). Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman, Michael Fassbender, and the rest of the classic mutants put on a great show and new arrivals like Quicksilver brought energy to the film. This and X-Men: First Class are my favorite of the X-Men movies. They somehow managed to make Fan Bing Bing look terrible, which is my only real complaint about the film.

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In conclusion, I’m looking forward to more great comics this year though I have some concerns about a few creative teams at DC (Wonder Woman) and will miss some of my favorite creators and titles as they disappear from the shelves, hopefully replaced by new books of splendor, wonder, and ideas.

 

 

crisis7

This entry’s headline is my first attempt at writing something genuinely internet. While my clickbait virginity is now something only of memory, my assertion that you will see Crisis on Infinite Earths, specifically issue #7, like you’ve never seen it before- but I must admit it is similar to how you’ve seen it before. This is the story that began many months ago when I saw George Pérez on Comic Book Men, a show that I think should be able to have a comic creator on every episode. Sadly appearances by comic book creators are rare and I don’t know why. It seems like a great way to promote comics. They’ve had a few, Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo, and Stan Lee, but mostly their guests come the worlds of film, television, garage sales, hockey, and cage fighting. In the episode “Super Friends,” three of the four Comic Book Men arrange to have George Pérez draw Wonder Man for the fourth Comic Book Man who lost a lot of his collection in Hurricane Sandy and also loved Wonder Man as Pérez had drawn him. Almost immediately upon meeting, the Comic Book Men notice a large print of the cover of Crisis on Infinite Earths #7 and Pérez points out a bit of trivia. Of all the superheroes mourning the death of Supergirl, one character is absent- a particular favorite of yours truly, Green Lantern Hal Jordan. The reason given for his omission is that Pérez simply forgot.

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I happen to have an older trade of Crisis on Infinite Earths that I scored in a brilliant craigslist acquisition a few years ago when I was first getting into comics. Last month I saw that George Pérez would be coming to this year’s Dragon Con and I started thinking what a pleasure it would be to meet him. I also took a look at my copy of Crisis of Infinite Earths, thinking it would be great if he could sign it, but then I got an idea. I rubbed out some of the black space next to Flash, making room for Hal Jordan- likely people to stand next to each other in a moment of grief. Pérez was pretty popular and my duties at the Art Show cut into my time pretty sharply, so I had to find a chunk of time to wait in line. Pérez did a lot of sketches for people and that made the line move pretty slowly. All of those sketches were much bigger than my request, at least in size.

George Pérez at Dragon Con 2014

Here you can see him drawing Hal Jordan in. Also visible is the Teen Titans book I had him sign, another gem the previously mentioned craigslist score. The shirt Pérez is wearing was made by his wife. She makes all his shirts. How splendidly romantic.

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You can see him there standing near Flash and the Phantom Stranger.

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Here’s a close-up of the art. Like this, he looks a bit like a White Lantern, which makes him so out of place for so many reasons because despite the presence of infinite earths, there was no White Lantern Corps yet and also every other character is purple. To rectify this, I have done a quick and dirty digitizing and coloring which you can see below.

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I’m pretty happy with my very peripheral piece of impossible comic book history and with my experience meeting Mr. Pérez, a very pleasant and patient gentleman.

So Dragon Con is finally over and I’m too tired to type too much. I had a ton of fun volunteering at the Art Show- a great gang of volunteers- much better experience than when I volunteered with Security last year. I think my panel went well- I was amazed how many people showed up despite the parade going on outside. Anyway, I promised some folks I post some pictures of costumes I saw over the weekend. My friend printed me a bunch of stickers of my drawings (mostly images that I’ve posted here) and he asked I take a picture of the people to whom I gave stickers. Unfortunately because I spent over 20 hours in the Art Show where photography is prohibited, most of the people you got stickers are not posted here and a few of these pictures are from Friday and the stickers didn’t arrive until Saturday. SO… enjoy these pictures.

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Green Arrow (New 52)

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Marko (from Saga, the best comic on the shelves) & Alan (Zach Galifianakis’s character from The Hangover). This was my favorite cosplay I saw all weekend.

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Psylocke

blackcanary

Black Canary

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Macho Man Randy Savage (there was a lot of wrestling cosplay this year)

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The Penguin

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Greendale Human Being (Go Greendale. Lower your standards. Six seasons and a movie.)

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I don’t know, but I dig it. The tail is especially creepy.

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Raven

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Princess Daisy

harleyquinnnighty

Harley Quinn After Hours

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Huntress

sinestro

Sinestro

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Static Shock

To my pictures from last year, click here but I should warn you that not all of the images are suitable for all audiences- you could say that are not safe for work, if that’s your lingo.

Boy With Clouds

Here are a few drawings I did last week. Two pandas and two cats.

Six with Cat

My Last Best Friend

I finished reading God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut yesterday. If you haven’t read it, I strongly encourage it. Some passages are so spot on that one must immediately reread them to make certain such truths actually made it to print. I read my wife’s copy and the book had evidently had a previous owner as well. I don’t know them, but after reading all their notes and seeing the words they underlined, I feel as if I know one thing about them- they really missed the point of the book. Mostly they had underlined words, presumably so they could look them up in the dictionary. The underlined words were either SAT words or words with less relevance outside their time, geography, and experience than within them. The passages that were underlined seemed to be sentences that would’ve agreed the grand old American objectivist Ayn Rand, a woman whose philosophies run counter with the book’s Hamletesque protagonist Eliot Rosewater. The book looks critically at the class system of the United States, both as an institution and in everyday practice. It is particularly sympathetic to the poor, victims of economic turmoil beyond their control and becoming less relevant with the advent of machines. Eliot’s father makes a lot of statements against welfare assistance, social programs, and “obscenity”- these were the statements that the previous reader decorated with meaningless notes like “Well-stated!” Perhaps the saddest part is a little note they wrote to themselves saying “I think Kilgore Trout may have helped write this book. There’s a sentence on the back of book.” As readers of Vonnegut well know, Kilgore Trout is a reoccurring character in his books, a science fiction writer who tells heavy truths in his work, much like the author in Saga. That’s a great comic, Saga. Anyway, it was fun to read this book alongside such an innocent reader that I’ve never met. I’ve consumed a lot of used textbooks, mostly history and philosophy- nonfiction – and I could understand why people underlined and took notes. Nonfiction is much easier to untie than fiction- when you read along with a stranger with a nonfiction work, you can start to see the argument they’re putting together or at least pieces of it. With fiction, you often get people underlining for more sentimental reasons. Sure, they could be literature scholars, but you can tell the difference between a scholar and a sentimental reader. You don’t feel like a peeping tom when you’re sharing research with a scholar- that’ s the transparency that gives our knowledge value. However, reading fiction with a stranger’s notes feels a bit perverted and sparks the engines of imagination and totally unsolicited judgement on the person’s entire being. It’s a love/hate relationship- maybe other people fantasize about meeting that person, sharing their intellectual insights, falling in love, etc. but I just think “What a fucking idiot” every time I see what they underline or read the notes they write. I take those little clues out of context, build an unflattering context around them, and then rule that whoever read the book before me is exactly what’s destroying civilization. It’s worse if you borrow a friend’s book and they’ve underlined all these sappy emotional passages and your imagination forces you to apply it to things in your friend’s life. Or what your mom underlined in 50 Shades of Grey.

Anyway, here are a few different covers that have been used for God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut. Who wore it better?

To Give Eliot Rosewater is twice the lunatic you'll ever be

god bless you winston smith

Fly Hunter god bless you mr rosewater and forget bill murray

V for Vendetta

Stuff My Piggy Bank

Title Page Rave Til Dawn

Three Books One Cup

Sylvia is Ophelia

When I'm An Old Baby

Pigs on wheels Dresden Copy

yujiawawa

Here’s a picture I did for one of my wife’s old high school friends. She and her husband recently had a baby. Their daughter is pictured playing with a pack of cigarettes and adjusting her sunglasses. They live in Zhuhai, Guangdong province..

lilaskin

Here’s a picture I did a year ago for some friends when they became new parents. I’m going to do another picture of their son and plan to do one every year. The boy’s father is an old comrade of mine, benim yoldaş, who makes really good cheese and champagne at his farm in Maine. The boy’s future will surely be the stuff of legend.

boredjoker

I found out the exact time I’ll be presenting at this year’s Dragon Con. It may very well be the worst time to be scheduled to speak as it coincides with one of the con’s main attractions- the parade. Every year the parade seems to get bigger and bigger, both the participants and the swelling and sweating crowd of on-lookers. With so many of the con’s attendees enjoying with the parade, there should be plenty of seating available for my discussion. If you’ve ever been looking for an excuse to get out of sitting in the sun and squeezing in tight with the masses, my presentation is a great excuse! Truth be told, I’m pretty happy to have this excuse to get out of watching it myself. The only thing I’ll miss about missing the parade is sharing the convention with Atlanta residents who don’t join in the actual con- the bystanders, the henchmen, the non-playable characters.

My presentation will be held on Saturday August 30, 2014 at 10am, presumably in the Comics room and I will presumably be presenting with two other scholars with a somewhat similar focus- the shared focus bit will likely be a little forced. My presentations looks at the multiple mythologies, religious in nature, that appear in the DC universe, specifically in the New 52 and more precisely involving Wonder Woman, the Phantom Stranger, and Green Lantern Simon Baz.

Think of the panel as a parade for people who don’t like parades. It should be fun, but if you choose the parade over my panel, take pictures for me because you know where I’ll be (at my panel AKA the parade for people who don’t like parades AKA the grenade for people who don’t like Gatorade).

Was the scheduling of my presentation at the same time as the parade an act committed by a secret organization (or cabal of secret organizations) worried that I might reveal truths that would send their pervasive institutions into paralyzing shock, essentially crippling the most powerful and sophisticated network of control ever put into practice in the history of the world? Is the EU worried my revelations on changes to Wonder Woman’s lineage could fuel an economic rebirth in Greece- a Wonder Tiger for the second half of this miserable decade? Will the 700 Club have to change its name to the 701 Club after I expose the Phantom Stranger for the strange phantom he is? How will OPEC react to my forgiving portrayal of the oddest of Earth’s Green Lanterns Simon Baz? Will they share my appreciation his unlikeliness? Or was it the Freemasons all along… worried about how Killer Croc is going to look when it’s revealed he’s been pulling the strings in this puppetshow ever since Brentwood!

lizardgossip

enchantmentunderthesea

Enchantment Under The Sea

Maybe this is a piece on time travel, maybe it’s a love story between a second and a minute and how their respective second and minute communities don’t approve.

bugmatador

Retirez le soutien-gorge, retirez les fers

Here the subject is stepping out on its own terms in the face of circumstances beyond control- that comforting lie as we chase a manufactured sense of tranquility. See how the beast lets their hair down! Capture them at their most vulnerable! Prove your authenticity via your dormancy! Demonstrate your value to the system through your recreational activity! Everything can be work! —or—- It’s some kind of villain alien, best case scenario fortune teller/oracle/celestial grifter.

 

 

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